home Features Cliques at d.tech – Do They Exist?

Cliques at d.tech – Do They Exist?

by James Abraham

Photo by Matt Silverman

During the last two weeks of April, I embarked on a journey to collect the thoughts of students throughout the school on what they thought the social life is like at d.tech, and if they found the atmosphere inviting. 

Students said that while there are definitely cliques, they are unlike other schools, and aren’t exclusive. One sophomore, Ella Howard,  said, “I think there are definitely groups, but I think it’s more based on interest rather than who likes who, and it’s not as much about people not liking each other.”

Across grades, people expressed the belief that cliques were natural, and even beneficial in some cases. The interviewees also said they believed that, while relationships overall weren’t bad, they weren’t necessarily always friendly. Jonathan Ferreira, a junior, mentioned that there were “a few bad apples” that he didn’t think “the school has punished…hard enough.”

When asked whether or not teachers should play a role in regulating the social culture, most students were in agreement: no. One anonymous interviewee replied: “They don’t really regulate it, the students regulate, and the students do a good job. The teachers should only play a role if there is a problem, but I don’t think there is a problem.” Another student, sophomore, Spencer Wong, even stated that, “I think if anything, the teachers are a little too friendly, like they try too hard to be a friend instead of a teacher.” He said he thought the teachers should only play social role if there was “a problem.”

“I think if anything, the teachers are a little too friendly, like they try too hard”

One of the largest areas of agreement between individuals, including teachers, was the belief that there wasn’t very strong school spirit at d.tech, with the exception to the robotics team. One freshman, Kate Hayashigatani, said she believed that part of the reason for this was due to a lack of school apparel, leading to an inability for people to show their spirit.

Ferreira also pointed out one specific social problem due to d.tech’s small campus: “if you stop being friends with someone, you won’t be able to avoid them.”

Jonathan Ferreira, a junior, mentioned that there were “a few bad apples”

Overall, there was widespread agreement across grades and teachers that most students at d.tech are indeed friendly, and any groups formed are mostly inclusive.

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